Giant Beaver

Beaverlodge Giant Beaver Sculpture Roadside Attraction - County of Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada | SAMTSAI.COM

May 24, 2009: Rumour says touching this Giant Beaver's teeth will make your teeth and bones stronger.

History of The “Beaver Project”

The “Beaver Project” was initiated by local entrepreneur Alex Lojczyc, who had always dreamed of giving Beaverlodge something to bolster town spirits and encourage tourists to visit our pretty little town. It all began in February, 2004 when the idea took shape. From there, grant applications were submitted and donations were solicited. With the support of all the generous contributors, and the encouragement of Recreation Direct, Randy Boettcher, town office staff and council, the dream became a reality! On July 16th, 2004, the magnificent Beaver Sculpture arrived at its new home right alongside Highway 43 in Beaverlodge, Alberta.

Source: Beaverlodge Giant Beaver Sculpture Monument

Beaverlodge Giant Beaver Sculpture in Summer Time - County of Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada | SAM TSAI . COM

May 24, 2009: The tail is equally sexy, only tale will tell... ;-)

History of Beaverlodge, Alberta

The first settlers arrived in 1898, attracted by stories of the most beautiful river valley in the Peace River Country. The Beaver Lodge River Valley offered everything—coal, water, wood, animals, grass, springs, rivers, berries and moderate weather.

The town is named after the Beaver Lodge River, which flows one and a half miles southwest of the town. The name Beaver Lodge is derived from “Lodge” or temporary dwelling of the Beaver Indians.

The first Post Office was established in 1910. It was named Redlow, because the name Beaver Lodge had already been given to the office at Lake Saskatoon. In 1912, Redlow was renamed Beaver Lodge when Lake Saskatoon relinquished the name. With the arrival of the railway in 1928, a new townsite was created about one mile northwest of the original hamlet to align with The Railroad tracks and about 100 buildings were moved. Beaver Lodge became a village in 1929 and a town in 1956. Shortly thereafter, the post office revised the spelling of the two words into one – Beaverlodge.

Beaverlodge is home to Canada’s most northerly agricultural research station and serves as a centre for a large agricultural area. The Research Station, founded in 1917, is widely recognized for their work on honey bees and saskatoon berry cultivation, in addition to research on conventional crops. In 1994, PRT Group built a tree nursery in Beaverlodge providing a full range of standard seeding products and related nursery services to the forest sector.

Beaverlodge has also overcome its share of obstacles and prevailed: First, the fire which destroyed most of main street in the late 1940’s, and then again in December 2002. A number of businesses destroyed by the fire have since been rebuilt. Second, the closure of our Armed Forces Base in June 1988 which resulted in a number of residents being transferred elsewhere in Canada.

Our town has prospered. We now boast a population of 2100 people and we are growing. Beaverlodge offers all major public services and has a thriving business community supported by various industries such as agriculture, oil, natural gas, sand/gravel and logging.

Source: Beaverlodge Giant Beaver Sculpture Monument

Beaverlodge Giant Beaver Statue in Summer Time - County of Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada | SAMTSAI.COM

May 24, 2009: Sitting under the Giant Beaver.



Beaverlodge Giant Beaver Sculpture and Beaverlodge Cultural Centre - County of Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada | SAM TSAI . COM

May 24, 2009: Behind the Giant Beaver is Beaverlodge Cultural Centre, which provides tourist information and history of Beaverlodge.

Beaverlodge Cultural Centre in Summer Time - County of Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada | SAMTSAI.COM

May 24, 2009: Beaverlodge Cultural Centre

Map and Driving Direction

Exact location of Giant Beaver is indicated by Green Arrow on this map.


Leave a Reply